• Travellers affected by Mt Rinjani’s eruption should check their insurance

    Date: 2019.02.19 | Category: 南京夜网 | Tags:

    Mount Rinjani spews clouds of gas on Lombok island, east of Jakarta, Indonesia. Photo: Julian Sihombing Mount Rinjani spews clouds of gas on Lombok island, east of Jakarta, Indonesia. Photo: Julian Sihombing
    Nanjing Night Net

    Mount Rinjani spews clouds of gas on Lombok island, east of Jakarta, Indonesia. Photo: Julian Sihombing

    Mount Rinjani spews clouds of gas on Lombok island, east of Jakarta, Indonesia. Photo: Julian Sihombing

    Travellers caught out by the latest volcanic eruption in Indonesia may find their insurance nullified by a previous eruption from a different mountain five months ago.

    An insurance industry source who asked not to be named said the “chatter” among insurers was whether the eruption of Mt Raung​ on July 2 was related to Tuesday’s eruption of Mt Rinjani​. If so, the second eruption could be classified as a “foreseeable event”, which in many cases exempts the insurer from paying out.

    Both Virgin and Jetstar have cancelled flights to Bali over the past two days after Mount Rinjani on the island of Lombok erupted earlier this week. The eruption comes less than a month before hordes of Australian school leavers will descend on Bali for the annual Schoolies week.

    Fairfax Media has established that Cover-More, which provides travel insurance for a number of popular travel brokers, has decided not to deem the two eruptions as related, meaning losses from Tuesday’s eruption will be covered.

    The insurer has warned those who purchase cover after Tuesday that cancellations and flight changes will not be covered.

    Other insurers may make different decisions.

    Choice spokesman Tom Godfrey warned that it was possible some insurers  might refuse to provide cover for claims lodged in the days after the eruption because they will consider it to be a “known event”.

    “If you are in the process of booking flights and accommodation, it’s important to contact your travel insurer and confirm you’ll be covered if the ash cloud continues to cause problems,” he said.

    The warning follows a report in Fairfax Media last month  on publican Guy Greenstone  being denied coverage by his insurer after Mt Raung erupted in July.

    Denpasar’s airport has been declared closed until 8.45 am Thursday, Bail time. AIr Asia has also cancelled all flights to and from Bali and some flights within Indonesia are also affected.

    Mr Godfrey said travellers should check their flight for delays or cancellation before going to the airport. If there are any problems, call the airline to re-book or claim a refund. After this, contact accommodation to re-arrange your booking.

    Only then should the insurer be contacted to look for cover of any out-of-pocket expenses.

    Mitchell Watson, research manager with consumer research firm Canstar, said travellers needed to first understand how the eruption might  affect their plans before contacting their insurer. That meant checking flights and booked accommodation to understand any postponement or cancellation policies that might trouble their plans.

    “The travel insurer shouldn’t be the first point of contact,” he said. “First understand what your disruption is going to be because that will be what your travel insurer is going to be requesting of you.”

    This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.